As autonomous driving technology companies test their vehicles on public roads and gather data at its wake, there are several driving-related jobs that might be at risk over the next decade. Driving autonomy is expected to make early inroads into the long-haul freight market before venturing into self-driving across urban spaces, as it is easier to navigate highways than crowded city streets. There are instances of limited deployment of semi-autonomous long-haul trucks in the U.S. already, such as UPS, which has been delivering cargo using self-driving trucks between Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, since May 2019. However, there are still segments within the trucking industry that cannot be automated, including the last-mile segment where truckers are customer-facing in addition to hauling cargo. FreightWaves spoke with Doug Ladden, the CEO of Deliveright, a last-mile delivery network, to discuss the daily lives of truckers who also double up as last-mile assemblers.  “Most people think of truckers as people who drive tractor-trailers, who may or may not be involved in loading or unloading a truck, which is usually done by people at the warehouse where the tractor-trailer end...