Being unprepared for mountain weather and terrain, plus hiking in sandals, are recipes for disaster on the trail. This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules. Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Cindy McJunkin, a veteran hike leader with Carolina Mountain Club and Smoky Mountain Hiking Club, said being unprepared, for mountain weather and terrain, is what she sees as the biggest source of getting into trouble on the trail. “It’s really difficult when you’re at your home at 2,200 feet (in elevation) and it’s sunny, to visual how much cooler and windier it is in the mountains,” said McJunkin, 58, a nurse from Candler. With about 100 search and rescue operations a year, the Smokies, a half-million acres of dense, forested mountains spreading across Western North Carolina and Eastern Tennessee, has the most of all national parks in the Southeast, and is in the top 10 for lost and injured hikers in the country. McJunkin is intimately familiar with the dips, valleys, summits and drainages in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, having hiked all 900 miles of trails in the park. “I’ve learned to always think about cooler temperatures a...