(function () { var s = document.createElement(‘script’); s.type = ‘text/javascript’; s.async = true; s.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://s’ : ‘http://i’) + ‘.po.st/static/v4/post-widget.js#publisherKey=epjos4ekslllnu572dhn’; var x = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); })(); With the advent of lightweight pickups, though, viscous damping fell into ill-repute, allegedly because it caused too much pivot friction. In truth, the criticism was valid only in that the existing viscous-damped arms simply had too much pivot damping for the new pickups. The main purpose of tonearm damping is to control the low-frequency peak that normally develops through interaction of the pickup’s compliance and the combined mass of the arm and pickup. Depending on its frequency (and this in turn will vary from one arm-and-pickup combination to another), this bass resonance can cause acoustic feedback, exaggerated turntable rumble, heavy, muddy bass, and extreme sensitivity to floorborne vibrations. Unfortunately, there is usually no way of predicting, ...